• strength •


Last week, one of my friends pointed out how, sure, there are a lot of quiet and good women in the Bible but, hey, take a look at Jael who drove a tent peg through Sisera’s face with a hammer. Or look at Ruth. Esther. Deborah.

I mentioned that Judith was pretty hardcore too.

But then I realized that we tend to glorify the physical embodiment of strength and often forget or overlook the quiet battles people fight.

Take, for example, Jesus’ mother, Mary. I think many people overlook her because she was quiet. But if you think about it, she is one of the strongest women in history. She was asked to be GOD’S mother. She didn’t know fully what that meant, but she said yes anyway because He asked her and she trusted Him.

She listened to Simeon’s prophecy when Jesus was a baby and it’s said that she kept this in her heart. It’s one of the seven swords of sorrow which pierced her heart.

She watched her Son, whipped, bloody, spat on, half-dead, carry the piece of wood He would die on up a steep, steep hill. She watched the nails go through His Body and she watched Him die. She cradled her Son’s dead Body in her arms before laying Him in the tomb and watching the stone be rolled over the entrance.

But she didn’t abandon her faith and she didn’t run away. That requires more strength than beheading a man.

To me, the total, radical obedience to God is amazing, regardless of physical feats.

I think that, with the help of films and the internet, we’ve grown more accustomed to seeing strength. We see people in armor or camouflage wielding a sword, gun, or knife. We see a dude with muscles, veins, and a busted lip and go, “wow, he’s strong”. But we don’t look at the smiling woman with EDS and think, “I wish I had her strength”.

So I think that, while, yes, these women in the Bible who beheaded army commanders and drove tent pegs through their heads were courageous and strong, we need to keep in mind that they could not have done that without the meekness, humility, faith, and trust in God – the invisible strength – first.

We should always consider what had to happen to get a person to where they are or what they’re famous for before glorifying their position.

Maybe they don’t deserve their titles.

Maybe they deserve so much more.

Love,

Rana || xoxo

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