Tomorrowland: A Review


Note: There are spoilers contained in this post. If you don’t care either way, keep reading. 😉

~*~*~*~*~

I’ll be honest. I saw Disney had a hand in this and immediately kind of looked the other way, hoping something better would come along for me to see.

But my little sister was dying to see it, my cousin from Canada (GUYS, THE STEREOTYPES ARE TRUE. CANADIANS ARE VERY POLITE.) and a cousin from Naples came over, so we planned an outing and went to see this.

I was (mostly) impressed but mostly by the “bad” guy, who wasn’t so bad as apathetic, which is arguably the worst kind of bad there is. (Contradictory? Maybe.)

If you’re fuzzy on the plot line, basically this girl finds a pin and whenever she touches it, it transports her to another world. She runs into a man who had lived there for some time and he wants nothing to do with her or that world. But a series of unfortunate events (read: robots try to kill them) leads them both into that world where they find out that Earth is going to end.

The man, Frank Walker (played by George Clooney), comes to believe that the girl, Casey Newton (played by Britt Robertson), is special and can save the world.

Pros

>> David Nix (played by High Laurie) says something that really hit me. A transmitter from Tomorrowland is sending a signal to Earth with a message of death and destruction. He meant it to be a warning, but when Newton says they need to send a message of hope instead, he tells a striking truth: it doesn’t matter what you say. People are so obsessed with the end. He sent a warning message, but people ate it up and turned it into fantasy. They turned it into a t.v. series, movies, books — entertainment. They resigned themselves to it because they thought, “what can I do? Nothing. So let’s all do nothing together and laugh ourselves to the end.”

Why? Because “it requires nothing of them today.” People will sit in their comfortable apathy believing they can do nothing and they’re cool with that. And when the end of the world comes, they’re throw their hands up and say they couldn’t have stopped it anyway.

That was the salvation point of the whole movie for me because it was so truthful. We turn into comedy and entertainment that which we “can’t” change so we can accept it when it comes with a numb and comfortable apathy.

>> I’m conflicted on characterization. They did a relatively good job developing the characters, but I felt like Newton was a little too optimistic for me to entirely believe. She was fun though. Walker was a bit of a stereotypical grumpy old man who was too optimistic once, and comes to believe in good again because of the undaunted happy-child who shows up on his doorstep one day and turns his life inside-out. Nix was kind of brilliant, but still felt a little lacking (what motivation did he have to shoot [censored]?).

>> The concepts were pretty neat! I really enjoyed some of that sci-fi stuff going on. If you could learn what day and time you were going to die, would you want to know?

Cons

>> They kind of explain everything. It might have been for context, but it didn’t leave me wondering anything really.

>> They ended in a kind of abrupt way, but it wasn’t a cliff hanger sort of way. It was more like, “we have room for another movie, but it would make no difference to you if we followed up with it because you know all our secrets and the gist of what happens next.”

Bottom line: I would recommend going to see Tomorrowland! I wouldn’t say for you to go in expecting anything out of this world (my pun may be lost on those who haven’t seen it *laugh/gag/cough* Ahem.) but it’s entertaining for a couple hours and David Nix’s words do get you thinking: what am I doing to contribute to this apathy? Am I comfortable with that? Is there anything I can do to change it? If so, will I?

It’s definitely one of the rare Disney-involved films that I don’t despise and would recommend. 🙂

God bless!

Rana

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