Love in Literature


“We’re all fools in love.”

Jane Austen

I used to be a romantic. Now, I consider myself a realistic dreamer. I don’t plan on getting married or having kids. If it happens, it happens and I’ll thank God, but I’m done hoping and wishing for it. Most of my friends – you can tell who they’re going to end up with. And I hate them [/mild sarcasm]. I think I’ll just end up being a crazy cat lady one day. Let’s be honest: I’m not a fantastic people-person. I can hold a conversation most of the time, but I’m always freaking out that I’m asking too many questions or boring them or not being clear or whatever.

At the practice speech and debate tournament I went to on Saturday, a kind boy said hi (you know when you never really feel like a very noticeable person and then someone starts talking to you out of the blue and it’s one of the most touching things?). I ended up asking him about fifteen+ questions. Way to go, Rana.

Oh! And I also discovered that little girls are fascinated with pantyhose. I was wearing some and they kept touching and rubbing my legs. It was one of the most awkward moments of my life.

ANYWAY, I like love as a sub-plot in my novels. And I thought, “hey, why not do a post on love in stories?” So here we go. Some of my “rules” for love in literature:

#1: Insta-Love is an Insta-No-No

Just don’t do it. Please. It’s cheesy and not realistic. In this post, we went over whether or not to make things up or make them realistic. Although fiction is fake up to a certain point, it should also be believable. We read to see ourselves. Books are like verbal mirrors. If we can’t see ourselves reflected through a character’s actions, personality, or journey, we’re not really going to like the book. So, as far as love in concerned, I would steer clear of love-at-first-sight.

In Desensitized, Cael and Ashland end up becoming super good friends and fall in love eventually. But at first, they hate each other. The character arcs change throughout the story and that’s important to me. I like to see people get better. Love helps with that. (Not the cheesy, romantic love, but pure, selfless love.)

#2: It Should Be Significant in Small Ways

So, without Cael, Ashland would probably die – not in a ‘oh-I-can’t-live-without-you’ way, but just that she’s going through a ton and needs support. Without Ashland, Cael would probably continue to be a heartless leader who isn’t concerned with anyone’s quality of life, but just that they’re alive.

They change each other for the better and that’s what love is about. Love in literature should serve as a means of communicating that no man is an island. We’re social creatures and that’s not a bad thing. Also, it’s not all about the feelings.

Essentially, if your story isn’t impacted by the love sub-plot, then it doesn’t need to be in there. It needs to be significant, but not so that the whole focus is on the love.

#3: It’s not all about the feelings

Love is sacrifice. It’s willing to give up your personal, instant pleasure for the good of someone else. This is what we should see. We need an accurate portrayal of love in a world that constantly tells us that it’s nothing more than a //feeling.// Guys, it’s so much more than that. Writers have the ability to tell the truth without getting hated (as much as we would if we said our message to someone’s face).

#4: Don’t make it easy

Okay. It doesn’t need to be Romeo and Juliet level difficult, but it shouldn’t be – forgive me for being cliche, which I warned against in #1 – Bella and Edward easy. Love is a horrible, beautiful thing. It hurts, it feels good, sometimes it feels like nothing, but requires a choice (not a love-triangle choice, mind you, but a choice that’s either going to help or harm the other member in the relationship – think of a parent and their child – the parents gives up a lot for their children and we call it ‘love’).

Love is full of heartbreak and pain, but it’s worth it. Show that. Don’t make it a Ferris-wheel ride (I went on one maybe once or twice and they’re flipping scary. The dude running was like, “I can’t put more people on. I have to balance it out or I could kill everyone on this thing.”) with cotton candy and moonlight kisses. That’s not love. That’s a feeling. And love isn’t a feeling.

Well, I’m sure there’s more, but that’s what I’ve got for you for now.

I hope this helps and if you have any more to add, I’d love it! 😀

God bless!

Rana

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Love in Literature

  1. RANA MY DARLING HOW I’VE MISSED YOU. Life has been playing a horrible game with me called ‘Let’s Strangle Her and See How She Reacts.” XD Work. Work is eating my life.
    Okay, girl, onto the juicy stuff — THAT WAS AMAZING. And SO spot-on. I think you should have your own country to rule over, ’cause you’re so caring and wise and amazing that I think you’d make a really good queen. XD
    And I’ll be a crazy cat lady with you. And yes, little children love pantyhose. One of the little girls I care for on Sunday once kept pulling on them, like, “What is this second skin??”
    LOVE YOU, RANA! ;D

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Brilliant post, Rana! Would it be too cliche to say I loved it? Really, though, you completely described everything love ought to be, both in life and literature. I’ll definitely be keeping these points in mind as I work on the romance aspects of my story. By the way, Desensitized sounds incredible. I wish you the best with finishing it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: The Hunger Games: The Mockingjay: Part 1: A Review | The Villain Authoress

  4. Oh yes THANK YOU! No ham and cheese romance, puh-leez…. This was so great…you so-well described the kind of sub-plots I enjoy and try to aim for.

    And good luck with your speech and debate! I just joined a club late and am pretending not to freak out with all the work I have to do to catch up. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a reply! Go ahead! ::pokes:: Make my day!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s