Character Development (Part 6)


Sorry for the radio silence, darlings. I’ve been busy finishing up Spanish 1 (which I should be done this week!) and editing The Reset and dealing with life. I hope things have been going well for you. ❤

Character Development (Part 6)Today’s next to last part in the Character Development concerns uniqueness.

It is so important for each and every one of your characters to have a voice of their own. No two of your friends are exactly the same and neither should any of your characters be the same.

Last time, we discussed how you might want to consider discovering your characters’ personality types. The reason behind that was so you can bring them to life — know their quirks. But you’ll notice how, though two people might have the same personality types, they’re still very different.

For instance, I’m an introvert but I’m very friendly. I have no problem going up to a stranger and talking to them depending on the situation, etc. Now another introvert might have anxiety attacks over that sort of thing.

We’re all unique. Your characters should be too. Give them all different quirks. Give them different motives toward the same goal.

If two of your characters play the same role or sound similar, cut one. If you don’t, your readers might begin to get confused. I believe it was K.M. Weiland of Helping Writers Become Authors who said that if you don’t distinguish them, they’ll compete for the reader’s affection. It’s possible that, if they’re not written well, they could even cause the reader to not care.

You need the reader to care in order to keep reading. Every character needs to serve a purpose.

In The Lord of the Rings, every member of the Fellowship serves a different purpose and each is unique. There’s one elf, one dwarf, one wizard, two humans, and four hobbits. The two humans: Aragorn and Boromir are distinguished by the roles they play and their personalities. The four hobbits are distinguished by their voices and roles. The only two that get confusing are Merry and Pippin because they seem to have the same interests and mannerisms.

So just be aware of that and try to distinguish your characters for a lovable and memorable story. Often times, the characters make the book worth reading. 😉

I hope this helps, beautiful. 🙂

God bless!

Rana

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Character Development (Part 6)

  1. Pingback: Character Development (Part 1) and What Can We Learn From Batman? | The Villain Authoress

Leave a reply! Go ahead! ::pokes:: Make my day!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s